International Rosa Luxemburg Conference Berlin

International Rosa Luxemburg Conference Berlin

History
The XIX International Rosa-Luxembourg-conference will take place on Saturday, 11th January 2014 in Berlin Urania. Rosa Luxemburg was a Marxist theorist, philosopher, economist and revolutionary socialist of Polish Jewish descent who became a naturalized German citizen. Rosa Luxemburg (also Rozalia Luxenburg; Polish: Róża Luksemburg; 5 March 1871[1] – 15 January 1919) was a Marxist theorist, philosopher, economist and revolutionary socialist of Polish Jewish descent who became a naturalized German citizen. She was successively a member of the Social Democracy of the Kingdom of Poland and Lithuania (SDKPiL), the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), the Independent Social Democratic Party (USPD), and the Communist Party of Germany (KPD). In 1915, after the SPD supported German involvement in World War I, she and Karl Liebknecht co-founded the anti-war Spartakusbund ("Spartacus League") which…
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Long Night of Religions 2013

History
One hundred churches, religious communities and inter-religious associations come together for the second time for the Long Night of Religions in Berlin – offering a visible sign of the religious diversity of Berlin! #religion #berlin #diversity  Berlin, Germany One hundred churches, religious communities and inter-religious associations come together for the second time for the Long Night of Religions in Berlin - offering a visible sign of...
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Germany grapples with displaying Nazi art

History, News
Should Nazi art be exhibited? For a long time in post-war Germany, the answer was a clear and unequivocal no. Many people didn't want to deal with the propagandistic art of a murderous regime because it reminded them of their own complicity. Others didn't want it shown because they themselves had been victims of the Holocaust. It's still a highly sensitive issue in Germany: What to do with art that was commissioned by the Nazis between 1933 and 1945. More German museums are beginning to confront their own role during the period. Related articles Israel Museum Settles With Heir on Nazi-Looted Liebermann - Bloomberg (bloomberg.com) Heirs Outraged as Dutch Panel Rejects Nazi-Era Art Claim - Bloomberg (bloomberg.com)
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Rediscovering Jewish life in Berlin

History
According to a census of June 16, 1933, the Jewish population of Berlin, Germany's capital city, was about 160,000. Berlin's Jewish community was the largest in Germany, comprising more than 32 percent of all Jews in the country. In the face of Nazi persecution, many Jews emigrated from Berlin. Berlin's Jewish population fell to about 8,000 people as a result of emigration from Nazi Germany between 1933 and 1939, despite the movement of other German Jews to Berlin. Many locations in the German capital remember the Holocaust. Others are a testament to the golden eras of German-Jewish history and the most recent revival of Jewish culture in the city.
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DW looks at German History

History
German history How does Germany deal with its past? DW looks at German history from WWI to reunification. #germany German history Related articles Deutsche Bahn will use drones to catch graffitists in the act (wired.co.uk)
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Deserting the wrong way: Why soldiers went East

History
Some left for East Germany out of communist conviction, out of opposition to the Korean War, others to escape the racism at home – and at least one, in order to marry the woman he loved. #berlinwall Countless East Germans tried to flee communist oppression, but a new book documents the rare cases of western deserters going the other way. Matthew Luxmoore reports. Related articles Conservatives demand East German symbol ban (thelocal.de) Neo-Nazi Nuremberg: Germany forced to confront its dark side (independent.co.uk)
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Berlin History Museums

Berlin History Museums

History, Museums
Berlin is the capital city of Germany. Berlin was founded in the 12th century, and became the capital of the small country of Prussia. Prussia grew rapidly in the 18th and 19th century, and formed the basis of the German Empire in 1871. Berlin now became a major world city, known for it is leadership roles in science, the humanities, music, museums, higher education, government, diplomacy and military affairs. During World War II, it was virtually destroyed by bombing, artillery, and ferocious street-by-street fighting. It was split between the victors, and lost its world leadership roles. With the reunification of Germany in 1990, Berlin was restored as a capital and as a major world city. From Wikipedia Alliierten Museum – Under the title “How Enemies Became Friends,” the Allied Museum…
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What is your best Berlin memory?

What is your best Berlin memory?

History
Answer by Darby O'Connor: I'm going to possibly date myself with this answer. Whilst living in Berlin, I did not think this day would happen. If someone told me a year prior that this would happen, I wouldnt believe it. It was the night of 09. November 1989. We heard an announcement that East German travelers were free to go visit West Berlin. It was history in the making, a very wild night and following morning. It became known wordwide as the night the Berlin Wall came down. View Answer on Quora   Related articles Berlin's BDSM Scene What is Berlin's best-kept secret? Two London refugees living ze dream in Berlin Touring the Real Berlin How should you spend Valentine's Day in Berlin? Berlin Life on Facebook Berlin Sports on…
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Berlin’s Stolpersteines Remembering the Past

Berlin’s Stolpersteines Remembering the Past

History
This year marks the 750th Anniversary of the founding of Berlin and there are a lot of events planned. In general, though, history is very present on a day-to-day basis here, which I appreciate since I love history. There are impressive buildings, monuments and historical sites all over. Of particular note are the plaques on buildings and on the sidewalks (Stolpersteine) marking the places where people fell victim to the Nazis. Some buildings have large plaques (approx. 14"x18") that state the person's name, occupation and what happened to them. For example, every morning on my walk with the dogs, I see a plaque on a building of a famous director who was Jewish. His plaque denotes that he lived in this building for a few years and then fled the…
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