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Berlin Museums, Museums in Berlin

Berlin Museum Directory

 

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  • Abguss-Sammlung Antiker Plastik Berlin – Cast Collection of Ancient Sculpture (Archeology)
  • Ägyptisches Museum und Papyrussammlung – The Egyptian Museum owns one of the world’s most important collections of Ancient Egyptian Art. Through its pieces of art, mostly taken from the time of King Akhenaton (around 1340 BC) from Tell el Amarna, the museum has reached world standing and renown. Famous works such as the bust of Queen Nefertiti, the portrait of Queen Tiy and the famous ‘Berlin Green Head’ belong to the collection.
  • Akademie der Künste, Hanseatenweg – 20th Century Art, Theater, Literature, & Music.
  • Akademie der Künste, Pariser Platz – 20th Century Art, Theater, Literature, Music
  • Alice – Museum für Kinder – Museum for children – touching and being touched – Questions are encouraged. You can engage in person, ask questions and detect unusual themes that hide in your everyday life, and find their own answers.
  • Alliierten Museum – Under the title “How Enemies Became Friends,” the Allied Museum tells a unique story full of suspense and drama. It begins with the German defeat in World War II.
  • Alte Nationalgalerie – Old National Gallery
  • Altes Museum – Collection of Classical Antiquities
  • Anna Seghers Memorial Centres – The Anna Seghers Memorial Centre in Berlin-Adlershof is preserves the rooms where the world-famous authoress lived and worked, kept in their original condition, including her surviving library, with some 10,000 books, and many personal souvenirs. A small exhibition of her life and work features photographs, documents and valuable first editions of her books; Seghers’s voice can be heard on original recordings.
  • Anne Frank Museum – Since 4 November 2006 the new permanent exhibition “Anne Frank. here & now” can be seen at the Anne Frank Zentrum. It is an exhibition about history and the present. It tells the personal life story of Anne Frank and connects it to the world she lived in.
  • Antikensammlung – The Collection of Classical Antiquities presents artworks dating from Greek and Roman antiquity, including architectural remains, sculptures and vases, as well as inscriptions, mosaics, bronzes and jewellery. The collection is on display in two separate museums, the Pergamonmuseum and Altes Museum. In addition to these two main sites, objects from the Collection of Classical Antiquities (in particular art from the Roman provinces and Cyprus) have also been merged with artifacts from other collections to form part of the permanent exhibition in the Neues Museum.
  • Anti-Kriegs-Museum – Anti-War Museum – A Museum for Peace.
  • Archenhold-Sternwarte Berlin – Archenhold Observatory Berlin – Its landmark is the enormous telescope, the longest refracting telescope on Earth. It is 21 meters long. Originally, the telescope was only meant to be an exhibition piece for the Berlin Industrial Show in 1896.
  • Architekturmuseum der TU – The Museum of Architecture of the Technische Universität Berlin holds a collection of drawings, prints and photographs related to architecture, predominantly by 19th and 20th century Prussian architects. The Museum is one of the oldest institutions of its kind in Europe.
  • Art Library – The Kunstbibliothek (Art Library) has approximately 400,000 volumes and ranks among Germany’s leading institutions specializing in literature concerning the history of art.
  • Bauhaus Archive / Museum of Design – The Bauhaus Archive/Museum of Design in Berlin is devoted to the research and presentation of the history and influence of the Bauhaus (1919-1933), the most important school of architecture, design and art in the 20th century.
  • Belvedere on the Klausberg – Following the completion of the New Palace in 1769, Frederick the Great had the Belvedere on the Klausberg built as part of his beautification plans for the areas surrounding the palace. It was the king’s last architectural undertaking at Sanssouci. The building, which was the first “Belvedere” in Potsdam, established the tradition of creating architecturally designed lookout points within the royal seat power.
  • Belvedere on the Pfingstberg – Even as a crown prince, the later King Frederick William I was enticed by the breathtaking view over the city and countryside, which one could enjoy from the Pfingstberg, a hill lying to the northwest of the New Garden. In 1847 construction finally began on the long planned summer residence, which was not completed until 1863, two years after the death of the king.
  • Belvedere in the Park at Charlottenburg Palace – The KPM Porcelain Collection of the city of Berlin has been located in the Belvedere since 1971, a lookout pavilion built on the Charlottenburg Palace grounds in 1788 by the architect Carl Gotthard Langhans for King Frederick William II of Prussia. It is the most important public collection of Berlin porcelain and generally ranks among the most outstanding specialized collections within the capital.
  • Berlin Cathedral Church – The Cathedral of Berlin is the largest church in the city, and it serves as a vital center for the Protestant church of Germany. Reaching out well beyond the borders of the parish and of Berlin, the cathedral attracts thousands of visitors, year after year, from Germany and abroad. With church services, concerts, tours, and many more events and offerings, the cathedral presents a wide variety of opportunities to come closer to the Christian religious tradition.
  • Berlin Museum of Medical History at the Charité – The museum’s permanent exhibition “On the Trace of Life” provides a path through medical history over the past 300 years. The presentation follows the ever-changing historical view of and into the body, finally arriving at the “recipient” of medicine, the patient, and the possibilities inherent in today’s medicine. The heart of the museum is still the specimen hall, the core of which goes back to the collecting activities of Rudolf Virchow. Today, there are around 750 pathologic-anatomical wet and dry preparations on display in this area.
  • Berlin Underworlds Association – Experience the history of Berlin from an unconventional perspective! Since 1997, the Berlin Underworlds Association has been offering regular tours into some of the most important underground structures in the city. Although the majority of our tours are in or near the Gesundbrunnen station in the north of Berlin, we also offer tours in several other subterranean complexes that are otherwise not publicly accessible.
  • Berlin Museum of Medical History is an institution of the Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin and is located in the former museum building of the Pathological Institute on the traditional grounds of the Charité (Campus Mitte).The museum’s permanent exhibition “On the Trace of Life” provides a path through medical history over the past 300 years. The presentation follows the ever-changing historical view of and into the body, finally arriving at the “recipient” of medicine, the patient, and the possibilities inherent in today’s medicine. The heart of the museum is still the specimen hall, the core of which goes back to the collecting activities of Rudolf Virchow. Today, there are around 750 pathologic-anatomical wet and dry preparations on display in this area.
  • Berliner Planetarium und Sternwarte Wilhelm Förster – With live readings, radio plays, music or laser and multimedia shows, the planetarium is an impressive place. Come with us on a journey into the realm of fantasy … The Wilhelm Foerster Observatory is located on top of the “Islander.” Here you can discover in clear weather with the sky through the large telescopes – the planets and their moons, craters and mountains on our Earth’s moon, the sun and its spots and a large number of stars, nebulae and galaxies.
  • Berliner S-Bahn-Museum – For those fascinated by the Berlin S-Bahn and want to know how it all began with the city, ring and suburban rail?
  • Berliner U-Bahn-Museum – the official website of the Association of Berlin Underground Association for the latest information on the activities of the association, detailed information about the vehicles (currently 34 cars) and more.
  • Berliner Unterwelten-Museum – the exhibition, which is continuously being added to and improved, deals with the development of Berlin from an underground perspective. The main focus, however, is civil defense in the Second World War, the effects of bomb war and modern archaeological finds of the twentieth century. Further rooms deal with the removal of rubble from the streets in the post-war period, and another with story of a card catalog of forced laborers that was discovered by members of the association in a forgotten bunker in the year 2000.
  • Berliner Waldmuseum mit Waldschule Grunewald – The Protection of German Forests (SDW), founded in 1947, a non-profit organization since 1973 supports the forest museum with Forest School in Berlin. The SDW dedicated nationwide the objectives of nature conservation and environmental protection and youth education work, specializing in forest education. Founded in 1957, German forest Youth is the youth organization of the SDW. In addition to practical conservation work such as reforestation or forest hedge care is the active youth work with DWJ – youth trips or establishment of conservation centers like the former watchtower in Hohen Neuendorf / Frohnau north of Berlin to the highly acclaimed content.
  • Berlinische Galerie – Museum of Modern Art, Photography and Architecture. The Berlinische Galerie is one of the newest museums in the German capital and collects art from Berlin dating from 1870 to the present day – with both a local and international focus. Founded in 1975, the State Museum reopened in its own building close to the Jewish Museum in 2004, moving into a spacious industrial hall that has been rebuilt to provide 4,600 square meters of exhibition space. Fine art – painting, graphics, sculpture, multimedia – photography, architecture and artists’ archives provide a rich source, whose interdisciplinary relationships create exciting dialogues. Its outstanding collections include Dada Berlin, the Neue Sachlichkeit (New Objectivity) and the Eastern European avant-garde. The art of the divided and reunified city of Berlin provides another focus.
  • Bezirksmuseum Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg – The museum of Friedrichshain-Kreuzberg offers a history of the district. It maintains an extensive archive of the district’s two parts. There are changing exhibitions of regional and district history, usually at current issues, particularly on immigration, industrial, commercial and urban development, a permanent exhibition of departments of urban development and migration history on two floors, a historical typesetting and printing, the former printing Otto Schneider, a reference library on the history of Friedrichshain and Kreuzberg, museum education program for children, adolescents and adults as well as thematic guided tours.
  • Bezirksmuseum Marzahn-Hellersdorf – The District Museum Marzahn-Hellersdorf is a modern, living museum that explores the history of the district of Marzahn-Hellersdorf and its districts Biesdorf, Hellersdorf Kaulsdorf, Mahlsdorf and Marzahn and taught. Through exhibitions, guided tours, educational projects, events and publications, we want the visitors of all ages to encourage to deal with the complex history of the region, ranging from the first human occupation of our region 11,000 years ago to the modern large-scale developments.
  • Bildergalerie am Schloss Sanssouci – The Picture Gallery in Sanssouci Park – The paintings of King Frederick II (Frederick the Great) are presented in splendidly carved and gilded frames at Sanssouci’s Picture Gallery, the oldest remaining royal museum in Germany.
  • Bildungszentrum Berlin des BStU – History and tasks of the Federal Commissioner for the Stasi-files. The agency of the Federal Commissioner for the Stasi records (BStU) stores and administers in its archives the records of the Ministry for State Security (“MfS” as its acronym or colloquially termed “Stasi) of the former German Democratic Republic that were secured after the peaceful revolution of 1990. It encompasses a total of around 111 kilometers (about 50 miles) of documents and 1.4 million photos. Based on the provisions defined in the Stasi Records Act (StUG), the BStU allows access to these files to private citizens, institutions and the public.
  • Bockwindmühle Berlin-Marzahn – Marzahner wedding mill – The first wedding mill in Berlin and Brandenburg.
  • Bode-Museum – displaying the Sculpture Collection, the Numismatic Collection and works from the Gemäldegalerie – Old Master Paintings.
  • Botanischer Garten und Botanisches Museum Berlin-Dahlem – Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem.
  • Brecht-Weigel-Gedenkstätte – The Brecht-Weigel Memorial Center is situated in the side wing of the Brecht House in Chausseestrasse 125. Immediately next door lie the French and Dorotheenstadt Cemeteries, in which Huguenot generals, writers, composers, sculptors, philosophers and actors have their graves.
  • Britzer Mühle – The 90-hectare Britzer Garden offers garden art, gastronomy, concerts, events, sports and health facilities, animals and a museum railway – above all, however, it offers beautifully manicured gardens and pristine nature.
  • Bröhan-Museum – One of the most prominent museums specialized in Art Nouveau, Art Déco and the Berlin Secession. State museum for Art Nouveau, Art Deco and Functionalism (1889-1939).
  • Brücke-Museum Berlin – At the international level, the Brücke Museum has helped bring expressionism as important German contribution to the art of classical modern awareness: with exhibitions of “bridge” art from its own inventory, and to participation in large projects.
  • Buchstabenmuseum – The Museum of Letters is devoted to preserving and documenting letter forms. We are currently in the process of putting together our permanent collection and are actively searching out outstanding letter forms and typographic objects that merit preservation
  • Centrum Judaicum – Stiftung Neue Synagoge Berlin – the Centrum Judaicum has the task to assemble and address the history of the Jews in and around Berlin. It seeks to recall the achievements of the Jewish people and to preserve the memory of the Jews who were murdered.
  • Chinesisches Haus im Park Sanssouci – The Chinese House – The stately Chinese House in the “Deer Garden” of Sanssouci Park is an impressive example of the widespread fashion and fascination with China, which influenced the cultural tastes of 18th century court circles throughout Europe.
  • Collection Scharf-Gerstenberg – The Collection Scharf-Gerstenberg can be found in the eastern Stüler building and in the Marstall (stables wing) opposite Charlottenburg Palace. The Collection Scharf-Gerstenberg is exhibiting excellent works by the Surrealists and their forerunners. It presents the holdings of the “Stiftung Sammlung Dieter Scharf zur Erinnerung an Otto Gerstenberg”, the foundation of the Dieter Scharf collection in remembrance of Otto Gerstenberg. The spectrum of artists ranges from Piranesi, Goya and Redon to Dalí, Magritte, Max Ernst and Dubuffet.
  • Computerspielemuseum – World’s First Computer Game Museum – Opened in 1997, the museum was the first institution ever to present a permanent exhibition on the theme of digital entertainment. Since then we have accompanied the development of the medium with more than 30 exhibitions shown in Germany or an international scale. Our new permanent exhibition “Computer games. The evolution of a medium” saw its premiere on January 21st, 2011. You will find more than 300 exhibits on our premises for playing and exploring the cultural history of these games. We cordially invite you to join an entertaining time travel presenting the theme of Mankind at play in the 21st century.
  • Dahlem Museums – The district of Berlin-Dahlem is home to the Ethnologisches Museum (Ethnological Museum) and the Museum of Asian Art, which house the city’s collections of non-European art and culture. This group of collections, internationally the most significant of its kind in terms of scope, quality and symmetry, was planned as a museum center as early as the beginning of the 20th century, although its construction did not commence until the 1970s. The Museum of European Cultures has been housed in the same building since May 2005.
  • Daimler Contemporary BerlinThe Daimler Art Collection was started in 1977 and currently includes about 1800 works by German and international artists. The collection focuses on abstract and geometrical pictorial concepts, from which it derives its distinctive character.
  • Dampfmaschinenhaus (Moschee) – The Steam Engine Mosque – The Steam Engine Building, located on a bay of the Havel River called the Neustädter Havelbucht, is at once the most charming as well as the most exotic building in Potsdam. Frederick William IV, the “Romantic on the throne,” had it built by Ludwig Persius from 1841-1843, “in the style of the Turkish mosques, with a minaret as a smokestack.” The building, which could still be seen at that time from Sanssouci Palace, added a picturesque architectural accent to the Potsdam cultural landscape.
  • Das Verborgene Museum – Works by Women.
  • DDR Museum – The DDR Museum is the only museum which concentrates on everyday life in the GDR. We don’t only show the crimes of the State Security or the border defenses at the Berlin Wall but we display the life of the people in the dictatorship: Maybe you know the Spreewald pickles, nudism beaches and the Trabi – the rest of the life in this socialist state is unfamiliar to most of the people in the world.
  • Denkmal für die ermordeten Juden Europas – Memorial to the Murdered Jews of Europe.
  • Deutsches Historisches Museum – German Historical Museum
  • Deutsch-Russisches Museum Berlin-Karlshorst – German-Russian Museum Berlin-Karlshorst – After the German-Soviet agreement on the withdrawal of Soviet forces from Germany, both sides together decided already in 1990 to jointly commemorate at this location the historic event which ended World War II and Nazi rule. The painful meaning this war had for both countries led to the so far unique establishment of a museum in which former wartime enemies jointly recall the war. The museum is supported by a board of trustees representing both partners.
  • Deutsche Guggenheim – The Deutsche Guggenheim, which celebrated its tenth anniversary in 2007, is a unique collaboration between the Guggenheim Foundation and Deutsche Bank, and is widely regarded by both locals and visitors from around the world as one of the most exciting and experimental art museums in Germany.
  • Deutsche Kinemathek – Museum für Film und Fernsehen – The whole world of cinema under one roof – from the first moving images to digital film. The Deutsche Kinemathek presents its important collections on film history in the Filmhaus at Potsdamer Platz. In addition the Deutsche Kinemathek is responsible for the Retrospective section of the Berlinale, and puts on special film series, exhibitions, colloquia and other events.
  • Deutsches Blinden-Museum Berlin – information about the development of Braille, and in simple language. You can also download a Braille alphabet and make a Braille quiz.
  • Deutsches Historisches Museum – The future permanent exhibition, which will comprise some 10,000 square meters of exhibition space on the three floors of the Zeughaus, will contain artifacts and documents of German history that can be seen in as varied a frame of reference as possible. The basic principle for the permanent display will be to exhibit in three different types of rooms, in which German history will be presented within its European context and its regional diversity. From the 9th century to the present, the political, social, and economic aspects of German history will be depicted in reference to the history of Europe.
  • Deutsches Technikmuseum – The museum presents a broad spectrum of old and new technology.
  • Dokumentationszentrum NS-Zwangsarbeit Berlin-Schöneweide – Between 1933 and 1945, the central institutions of Nazi persecution and terror – the Secret State Police Office with its own “house prison,” the leadership of the SS and, during the Second World War, the Reich Security Main Office – were located on the present-day grounds of the “Topography of Terror” that are next to the Martin Gropius Building and close to Potsdamer Platz.
  • Domäne Dahlem – Landgut und Museum – Dahlem – Country Estate and Museum – Year round, you can visit the organic farm underground connection and farm shop, and our craftsmen at work, you may look over his shoulder. In the mansion, the oldest residential building in Berlin, which dates from 1560, and the restored stables you will find exciting exhibitions, including a historic Shop, a historic butcher, a food laboratory of the Imperial Health Office and the last domain milk coach.
  • Energie-Museum Berlin – The history of electrical engineering is inextricably linked with the history of Berlin. In 1866, Werner von Siemens (nob. 1888) discovered the dynamo-electric principle and the continuous generation of electricity paved the way. After the first experiments with arc lamps at the Pariser Platz in 1878 did not succeed, the mayor of Max Forckenbeck adopted on 20 September 1882 36 arc lamps in operation, the illuminated Leipziger Strasse from the Friedrichstrasse to Potsdamer Platz. September 20, 1882 is therefore considered as the birthday of the public lighting, which then developed the key drivers of electrification.
  • Ephraim-Palais – Stadtmuseum Berlin – The Museum Ephraim-Palais offers three floors changing exhibitions on Berlin’s art and cultural history. Additionally, it is the graphic collection of the City Museum.
  • Erinnerungsstätte Notaufnahmelager Marienfelde – Located on the historic site of the Refugee Center, the museum preserves and memorializes the causes, process, and consequences of inner-German flight, exploring not only flight from the GDR itself, but also the official process of emigration and the subsequent integration of refugees into the FRG. Marienfelde invites you to discover more about this history through its permanent and temporary exhibitions, diverse educational programs, special events, and research projects.
  • Erstes Berliner DDR-Motorradmuseum – In the museum you will find more than 140 motorcycles, scooters and mopeds, the manufacturer DKW / IFA / MZ, Simson Suhl, IWL and EMW is spread over approximately 1000 square meters of exhibition space over 2 floors. These are almost all models from 40 years of GDR production motorcycle, to many teams, sports and racing machines and special vehicles and authorities thinking wheels.
  • Ethnologisches Museum – With a total of 500,000 objects from throughout the world and large numbers of sound recordings, documentary photographs and films, the Ethnological Museum ranks among the largest and best of its kind. The museum collects, preserves and researches cultural products of per-industrial societies, primarily outside of Europe. The museum currently embraces the following collections: Africa, American archaeology, American ethnology, Europe, the Islamic World, Eastern and Northern Asia, South and South-East Asia, the South Seas and Australia, as well as the ethnology of music.
  • Feuerwehrmuseum Berlin – Fireman’s Museum.
  • Flatowturm im Park Babelsberg – The Flatow Tower, designed by Johann Heinrich Strack, was built between 1853 and 1856 and modeled on the medieval tower of the Eschenheimer Gate in Frankfurt am Main. In this way William I continued the Potsdam building tradition of erecting buildings with a view at locations.
  • Forum Willy Brandt Berlin – Willy Brandt’s personal and political life is closely linked to the city of Berlin. An exhibit here commemorates not only his dedication to the freedom of the once divided city but also his achievements as Foreign Minister and as Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany. The Willy Brandt House in Lübeck is the extra-scholastic learning center for recent history in the Nobel Peace Prize recipient’s birthplace.
  • Friedenskirche im Park Sanssouci – The Church of Peace was built from 1845-54, according to plans by Ludwig Persius and August Stüler, based on the designs of Frederick William IV. The triple-nave basilica is part of an architectural ensemble that includes the neighboring vicarage and the small Marly Palace. The ensemble embodied the king’s piety, which was influenced by both the Romantic era and his admiration for Italy. The Church of Peace was modeled after the early Christian church of San Clemente in Rome.
  • Friedrichswerdersche Kirche (Friedrichswerder Church) – was built between 1824 and 1830 after plans by Karl Friedrich Schinkel. As a brick building it follows the architectural tradition of the Marienkirche and the Nikolaikirche. Up to the present day, facade as well as interior match the original appearance. The twin-towered facade of the church, containing the main portal, points southwards to Werderscher Markt. Inside, one steps into a wide neo-Gothic space with a continuous wooden gallery. Here, Schinkel’s life and his main Berlin works are explained in illustrated texts. In the nave a selection of sculptures from Schinkel’s time are on display. Among them are the original model of Johann Gottfried Schadow’s most famous work, the “Two Princesses”, the marble tomb of the revered queen Luise von Preußen by Christian Daniel Rauch, several sculptures from the Berlin Palace, also effigies of Immanuel Kant, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, the brothers Humboldt as well as numerous other sculptures – together they paint a rich and multifaceted portrait of the Classicist era: its idea of man, its aims in the arts, and its achievements.
  • Gärten der Welt im Erholungspark Marzahn – Gardens of the World – The Recreational Park Marzahn arose from the horticultural show “Berliner Gartenschau” (1987) and presents garden art from around the world. Nine exotic garden worlds were designed and built by architects and artisans from the respective countries using original materials.
  • Gaslaternen-Freilichtmuseum Berlin – The gas lantern outdoor museum in Berlin is a permanent exhibition of historic gas lamps near the Berlin S-Bahn Tiergarten on the edge of Tiergarten. The collection is accessible all year round and the lights are switched on at dusk. Incidentally, 44,000 gas lanterns still exist in the streets of Berlin. That’s about half of all gas lanterns that are in operation worldwide!
  • Gedenkstätte Berlin-Hohenschönhausen – Since the vast majority of the buildings, equipment and furniture and fittings have survived intact, the Memorial provides a very authentic picture of prison conditions in the GDR. The Memorial’s location in Germany’s capital city makes it the key site in Germany for victims of communist tyranny.
  • Gedenkstätte Berliner Mauer – The Berlin Wall Memorial is the central memorial site of German division, located in the middle of the capital. Situated at the historic site on Bernauer Strasse, it will eventually extend along 1.4 kilometers of the former border strip. The memorial contains the last piece of Berlin Wall with the preserved grounds behind it and is thus able to convey an impression of how the border fortifications developed until the end of the 1980s. The events that took place here together with the preserved historical remnants and traces of border obstacles on display help to make the history of Germany’s division comprehensible to visitors.
  • Gedenkstätte Deutscher Widerstand – The German Resistance Memorial Center is a site of remembrance, political studies, active learning, documentation, and research. An extensive permanent exhibition, a series of temporary special exhibitions, events, and a range of publications document and illustrate resistance to National Socialism. The center’s goal is to show how individual persons and groups took action against the National Socialist dictatorship from 1933 to 1945 and made use of what freedom of action they had.
  • Gedenkstätte Köpenicker Blutwoche Juni 1933 – In the former prison of the district court Köpenick lies the memorial “Köpenicker blood Week of June 1933”. In May 1933, the Lieutenant Colonel Köpenicker SA established in some areas of the district court to be a headquarters. With the start of a “blood Köpenicker Week” events became known in June 1933, the SA seized the prison and abused it as a central detention and torture center in Köpenick. Under the guidance of the leader of the SA storm Herbert Plönzke SA led a terror campaign against the dissenter, which was marked by incredible brutality. Hundreds of regime opponents in the week of 21 June 1933 of the SA on the hardest abused and lost at least 22 of them their lives.
  • Gedenkstätte Plötzensee – The Plötzensee Memorial Center commemorating the victims of National Socialism is a site of quiet remembrance. From 1933 to 1945, nearly three thousand people unjustly sentenced to death by the National Socialist judiciary were executed here. Today, the execution chamber is a memorial. The exhibition in the room adjoining it documents the practice of the National Socialist judicial and penal system. This website displays the fourteen panels of the documents exhibition shown in the Plötzensee Memorial Center.
  • Gedenkstätte Stille Helden – Silent Heroes Memorial Center – The Silent Heroes Memorial Center commemorates individuals who helped persecuted Jews during the National Socialist dictatorship. The example of the helpers often described as “silent heroes” shows that it was possible to save persecuted people in Nazi Germany. Even in the German-occupied territories, a number of Germans still found the courage to help as far as they could, despite the risk involved. The permanent exhibition shows the persecution and the desperate situation of Jews facing the threat of deportation, how some of them decided to resist the threat to their lives by going underground, as well as the actions and motivations of the men and women who helped them. It documents not only successes in saving Jews, but also attempts that failed.
  • Gedenkstätte und Museum Sachsenhausen – concentration camps and the history of the Soviet special camps.
  • Gemäldegalerie – Old Master Paintings – With its many famous masterpieces, the building now ranks once again as one of the major European galleries and offers a comprehensive overview of European painting from the 13th to the 18th century.
  • Georg-Kolbe-Museum – Georg-Kolbe-Museum is located in the former studio-building of the sculptor Georg Kolbe (1877-1947) in Berlin-Westend close to the Olympic Stadium. Created from the estate of Georg Kolbe, this was the first foundation of a new museum in West Berlin in 1950. It was built in 1928 based on designs by Kolbe by Ernst Rentsch and borders on a sculpture garden that is a protected monument as is the whole ensemble.
  • Gipsformerei – Replica Workshop – Manufacturer in the Plastic Arts since 1819 – Our institution proudly looks back on a long tradition and boasts a unique collection of just under 7000 replicas of original works of art taken from all cultures of the world and from all epochs. Besides replicas of works from European and Egyptian art periods, we also offer objects from Central and South America, India and Africa. The oldest replicated artifact is the 25,000 year old Venus of Willendorf, while the largest is the 42 meters high Column of Marcus Aurelius from Rome.
  • Gotisches Haus – Gothic House – City History Museum Spandau – The Gothic building has been used by the Spandau district as “educational, meeting and information center”, where the first floor is a museum. A room a living room ensemble in Biedermeier style, another room a Gründerzeit kitchen. The permanent exhibition displays besides many small finds from this house and this time in individual cases. The tour is complemented by paintings and drawings with Spandau motives.
  • Grünauer Wassersportmuseum – Water Sports Museum – The museum provides knowledge about German history with selected examples of bourgeois sport, workers, women and sport in schools and the history of Jewish associations. Water Sports Museum also stands for the redesign of a German sports monument in memory of the 1973 destroyed sports monuments in Berlin Grunau.
  • Gründerzeitmuseum im Gutshaus Mahlsdorf – It is located at Hultschiner Damm 333 in Berlin’s district Mahlsdorf the district of Marzahn-Hellersdorf . It is home to Europe’s largest single It is located at Hultschiner Damm 333 in Berlin’s district Mahlsdorf the district of Marzahn-Hellersdorf . It is home to Europe’s largest single collection of musical instruments and furniture made between 1880 and 1900 and serves as a location for film and television productions as well as theater performances.
  • Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – The large entrance hall serves as a central space for orientation and leads to all other parts of the building. From there, one can reach the two-story western wing of the cour d’honneur, the ground floor of which serves as a permanent exhibition space dedicated to the work of Joseph Beuys. The eastern wing contains a restaurant and events forum. The great hall and the modern galleries are used for special exhibitions. Since September 2004, the Friedrich Christian Flick Collection with its first-class masterpieces is on permanent loan to the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin (National Museums in Berlin) and shown in the neighboring Rieck halls.
  • Hanf Museum Berlin – The Hemp Museum is the only of its kind in Germany, in addition to those in Bologna, Barcelona and Amsterdam is one of only four. In the heart of Berlin, in the Nikolai Quarter, the interested visitors can get a full picture of the old plant. The exhibition, which deals with all issues relating to the hemp, covers more than 250 square meters.
  • Haus am Waldsee – Haus am Waldsee is a place for international art originating in Berlin. Since 1946 it has been among Germany‘s foremost exhibition spaces contemporary art in Germany. It renders visible creative forces in the visual arts, design, architecture and sound, which are truly innovative and of exceptional quality. In five exhibitions per year the house presents mostly international contemporary positions and canonical post-war artists. In an atmosphere of concentration, backgrounds and developments are communicated in a way that actively seeks to engage children and adolescents in particular.
  • Haus der Kulturen der Welt – The Haus der Kulturen der Welt is a place for international contemporary arts and a forum for current developments and discourse. Located in the capital city of Berlin, it presents artistic productions from around the world, with a special focus on non-European cultures and societies.
  • Haus der Wannsee-Konferenz – The Wannsee Conference – At noon of 20 January 1942, a meeting of approximately 90 minutes took place in the dining room of the SD guesthouse. Representatives of the SS, the NSDAP and various Reich ministries attended this meeting, which was convened by Reinhard Heydrich, Head of the Security Police and SD. The subject of the meeting was the “Final Solution of the Jewish Question”.
  • Heimatmuseum Reinickendorf – Museum of National History – A revision of the permanent exhibition is being held since 2002. Since then the range of Prehistory and Early History and the six villages-space has been revised (the Middle Ages) and redesigned. 2005 was added in the Vladimir-Lindenberg-room.
  • Heimatmuseum Zehlendorf – From June of 1945, until their departure in 1994, American troops made their impression on the Zehlendorf scene. Barracks, headquarters, community assistance offices, living quarters, schools and recreation centers were omnipresent in the district. A yearly highpoint was the German-American Peoples’ Festival, during which the Berliners could come together and celebrate with the American community. Meanwhile, the Truman Plaza no longer exists and luxury apartments adorn the abandoned military occupation zones.
  • Heizungsmuseum Köpenick – The heating Museum Köpenick is part of the 1991 set up field laboratories Kanis Wall. This “green extracurricular learning” is in the largest contiguous protected area of Berlin. Covering an area of about 50 square meters kilns from different times, an industrial coal-fired heating and a paper press are issued. The different types of coal and other fuels are presented. Visitors will learn through demonstration experiments and exhibits a clear way of how these raw materials creates energy. It becomes clear what risks do the conventional heating for the environment. Logically, one can then use environmentally friendly renewable energy sources, such as Hydro, wind and solar power information.
  • Historische Mühle im Park von Sanssouci – THE HISTORICAL WINDMILL IN SANSSOUCI PARK – There has been a windmill very near to Sanssouci Palace since 1738. From 1787-91, Frederick William II had the old, adjustable windmill replaced by a larger windmill based on a Dutch model that included a stone foundation and a gallery.
  • Hugenottenmuseum – the French Friedrichstadt Church in Gendarmenmarkt square, usually referred to as “French Cathedral.”
  • Humboldt-Museum – Schloss Tegel – The Humboldt Castle – “the deep solitude in Tegel” – Humboldt castle near the northeast tip of Lake Tegel – on that castle that once colonial mansion was in 1766 by marriage into the possession Humboldt family arrived and was designed by architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel in 1820/24 put into the present form of a four-towered classical cube ‘. The scholar and politician Wilhelm von Humboldt (1767-1835), heir of the house, praised in a letter to the atmosphere of restraint and calm: “I like nothing better than the deep solitude in Tegel.”
  • Jagdschloss Grunewald – Grunewald Hunting Lodge – Serving as a museum since 1932, in addition to displays of furniture and porcelain, important paintings from the 15th-18th centuries can be seen in the palace today. Among these are portraits of the royal family by Lucas Cranach, as well as a gallery of well-known personalities from the 18th and 19th centuries. A highlight is the Great Hall on the ground floor. Numerous objects from the royal estates serve as records of the past, inviting the viewer to directly experience courtly art and the history of the hunt.
  • Jagdschloss Stern – This square is the hunting lodge, which was built in 1730-1732 by the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm I in the style of a Dutch town house. It is the only royal palace built this way. Inside there is the last wood-paneled room in a Prussian palace in Potsdam from the early 18th century.
  • Jüdisches Museum Berlin – Jewish Museum Berlin – The Jewish Museum Berlin was opened in 2001. The path from the idea to found a Jewish museum in West Berlin to creating an exhibition concept was a long and winding one with many controversies along the way. The controversies also reflect the change in the perception of Jewish history against the backdrop of the Holocaust.
  • Jugend Museum im Schöneberg Museum – The Youth Museum is a living history museum for everyone. In the old million mansion in Berlin’s Schöneberg district, we show unusual exhibits on local history. On three floors, children, adolescents and adults also discover the wonderful world of things and explore foreign life stories. There are also beautiful workshop rooms, a theater and a small museum print shop. The Youth Museum offers a diverse program of playful workshops for children and families to exciting youth projects. School groups will find many offers for historical study.
  • Käthe-Kollwitz-Museum Berlin – Käthe Kollwitz is undoubtedly one of the most important women of the modern age. Her art developed completely autonomously and shows all signs of genius. Her language is understood worldwide, whereas such prominent masters as Thoma and Menzel find lasting acclaim only in Germany, or, at most, in German speaking areas.
  • Keramik-Museum Berlin – Since 2004 (built in 1712), the Pottery Museum Berlin resides on the idyllic grounds of the oldest surviving public building from Charlottenburg near the Richard-Wagner-Platz. Annually in six to seven partially parallel exhibitions granted the KMB insights into many facets of the pottery of the German-speaking world from the mid-19th Century to modern times. This can be counted on one now over 7000 items – mainly collected through donations – rely collection inventory
  • Knoblauchhaus – The Knoblauchhaus in the Nikolai district counts as one of the most beautiful Berliner townhouses. The three-storey baroque building was erected in 1760 and has a gently curved façade. A visit to the Knoblauchhaus provides an opportunity to dive into the world of the Biedermeier: original reconstructed living rooms on the first floor are dedicated to the Knoblauch family members, and with their precious interiors let the spark of times-past live again.
  • Köpenick Palace – At Köpenick Palace, a new museum concept is devised: under the heading “RoomArt”, furniture and decorative art from the Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo periods are jointly presented.
  • KPM WELT – Experience the extraordinary exhibition KPMWELT in the neighborhood of the Royal Porcelain Manufactory in Berlin-Tiergarten. With the historical ensemble of furnace hall, Schlämmerei and former Machine Shop is one of the oldest preserved the manufacture commercial Berlin. Large and small visitors get in KPMWELT a comprehensive insight into the history and production of the Berlin porcelain. Acting jobs in turning, shaping, garnishing and decorating provide insight into the production and finishing of porcelain, as well as in the operation of the Manufakturisten.
  • Kunstbibliothek – The Kunstbibliothek (Art Library) has approximately 400,000 volumes and ranks among Germany’s leading institutions specializing in literature concerning the history of art. The library attracts 35,000 visitors annually.
  • Kunstforum der Berliner Volksbank – The art forum Berliner Volksbank, with its approximately 600 square meters of exhibition space round an exceptional place for temporary exhibitions in the field of visual arts with different partners. Among the exhibitions each appears a current catalog, tours and themed social events, and a special children’s and youth program in the workshop for creative offered.
  • Kunstgewerbemuseum – Museum of Decorative Arts – The Kunstgewerbemuseum (Museum of Decorative Arts) is one of the oldest of its kind in Germany. It possesses one of the most important collections of skilled craftsmanship. The museum can be found at two sites: Kulturforum and Schloss Köpenick (Köpenick Palace). This museum collects works of skilled craftsmanship ranging from post-antiquity to the present. It encompasses all the styles and periods in art history and includes silks and costumes, tapestries, decorative wainscots and furniture, vessels made of glass, enamel and porcelain, works in silver and gold as well as contemporary crafts and design objects. Most of the materials involved are of great value. Many items were commissioned by representatives of the church, the royal court and members of the aristocracy.
  • Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien – Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien is an exhibition space for contemporary art with a focus on current social and cultural issues. Central to the projects here are the meaningful contextualisation of themes and consideration for diversity, internationality, and local relevance. Kunstraum Kreuzberg/Bethanien owns a collection of round 450 artworks, which includes art from Hans Baluschek, Erich Büttner and other artist, who lived in Kreuzberg like Hanefi Yeter, Akbar Behkalam, Luise Grimm or Christa Eichler.
  • Kupferstichkabinett – The Kupferstichkabinett (Museum of Prints and Drawings) is the largest collection of graphic art in Germany – and one of the four most important in the world. It comprises over 550,000 works in the print medium and 110,000 drawings, watercolours and oil sketches. This ‘world of pictures and centre of research’ includes works by major artists ranging from Sandro Botticelli and Albrecht Dürer to Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol, via Rembrandt and Adolph von Menzel.
  • KW Institute for Contemporary Art – KW Institute for Contemporary Art in Berlin is a place for the production and presentation of discourse oriented contemporary art. KW has no collection of its own but instead views itself as a laboratory for communicating and advancing contemporary cultural developments in Germany and abroad by means of exhibitions, workshops and resident artists’ studios, as well as by collaborating with artists or other institutions and by commissioning works. In 1996 KW launched the Berlin Biennale for Contemporary Art, taking place for the eighth time in 2014.
  • MACHmit! Museum für Kinder – The MACHmit! Children’s Museum in Berlin Prenzlauer Berg: discover, try and explore, learn to recognize and be playful, understanding relationships and gain experience – for children 3 years and older.
  • Märkisches Museum – Built between 1901 and 1908, the red brick cathedral-like complex of the Märkisches Museum holds a history of Berlin as distinctive as its residents. Instead of a straightforward history lesson, expect a variety of themed rooms that give visitors a glimpse of the life, work, and culture of Berlin.
  • Marmorpalais – THE MARBLE PALACE MAKES A CONQUEST OF PRUSSIA – Frederick William II chose this space for the building of his summer residence (1787-93). In keeping with contemporary taste, the king had the palace built in the Neoclassical style by Carl von Gontard and Carl Gotthard Langhans. The palace and its gardens were reserved for the private life of the artistically inclined king.
  • Martin-Gropius-Bau – originally a museum of applied arts and a listed historical monument since 1966, is a well-known Berlin exhibition hall located at Niederkirchnerstraße 7 in Berlin-Kreuzberg.
  • Mauermuseum Haus am Checkpoint Charlie – discover objects used to escape over, under, and through the Berlin Wall, and read the stories of those escapees who risked their lives to win their freedom. Also remember and thus keep alive the memory of others who died in the attempt.
  • Mausoleum im Schlosspark Charlottenburg – Queen Luise’s Temple for Eternity – Immediately following the death in 1810 of the beloved Queen Luise, who was highly esteemed by the people, her mausoleum was built according to a design by Heinrich Gentz. The interior hall was initially intended only for the Queen’s marble sarcophagus, which was erected in 1815. When Luise’s husband, Frederick William III, died in 1840, the mausoleum was enlarged according to Schinkel’s designs. After the deaths of Emperor William I in 1888 and his wife Augusta in 1890, the building was enlarged once again and their marble sarcophagi were placed here in 1894. Aside from the royal couples mentioned above, other members of the royal family were also interred in a crypt beneath the mausoleum that is not open to the public: Auguste Princess von Liegnitz (the second wife of Frederick William III), and Prince Albrecht (Luise and Frederick William III’s youngest son), as well as Frederick William’s heart placed at the feet of his parents.
  • Max Liebermann Haus – The history of the past Liebermann house reflects the events of the last two centuries against Germany. In 1844 the house was built by Schinkel student Stüler. With the subject matters the three-storey house architecture seemed to his contemporaries clearly and soberly. At the request of the Prussian King Friedrich Wilhelm IV was taken to ensure that the house is not the Brandenburg Gate surpassed. For reasons of symmetry, the Brandenburg Gate was given by the same architect on the other hand, an architectural counterpart. As Max Liebermann moved in 1884 in the house at the Pariser Platz No. 7 with its neighbors were Prussian landowners, old and new nobility, industrialists and the French Embassy. 1933 Max Liebermann work to be banned, and he comes out of the Prussian Academy of Arts, which he was president until then. 1935 Max Liebermann died in his home at the Brandenburg Gate. Eight years later, the house was a bombing victim. Today’s Max Liebermann was after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Germany regained the sense of a “critical reconstruction” built by Paul Kleihues in line with the historical model again.
  • Mendelssohn-Remise – In 2004, the Mendelssohn-Remise was re-opened to the public in its original condition as part of the 18th annual “Jewish Culture Days”, which were dedicated to the theme “Mendelssohn & Company”. For further details, please see the Exhibition Brochure for the Jewish Culture Days 2004. Today, the Mendelssohn-Gesellschaft uses the coach house to host exhibitions and to organize cultural events in the tradition and spirit of the Mendelssohn family.
  • Militärhistorisches Museum der Bundeswehr – Flugplatz Berlin-Gatow – the Berlin Museum focuses on aerial warfare as the most recent development in the military use of force.
  • Mitte Museum – Mitte,Tiergarten and Wedding.
  • Mori-Ogai-Gedenkstätte – The Mori Memorial Ôgai Humboldt University provides an opportunity to learn about the life and work of the Japanese doctor, writer, translator and critic Mori Rintaro (Ôgai). Besides a Ôgai reference library, a digital Ôgai catalog available in which all the translations, articles, dissertations, etc. are recorded in European languages.
  • Münzkabinett – The Numismatic Collection is one of the largest collections of its kind with around 500,000 objects. The collection owes its international renown to its rich diversity as well as the comprehensiveness of its coin series which range from the beginnings of coinage in the seventh century BC in Asia Minor to the coins and medals of the twenty-first century.
  • Museum Berggruen – The Museum Berggruen, open since 1996, is situated in the Western Stüler building opposite Charlottenburg Palace. This building, originally designed by August Stüler to house the stables of King Wilhelm IV, was once home to the Antikensammlung (Collection of Classical Antiquities) from 1960 to 1993 before the Antikensammlung was reunified with collections in East Berlin and moved back to Altes Museum on the Museum Island. The conversion of the Museum Berggruen was executed after plans by the architectural office Hilmer und Sattler.
  • Museum Blindenwerkstatt Otto Weidt – The Museum Otto Weidt’s Workshop for the Blind tells the story of the workshop. The owner of the small factory, Otto Weidt, employed mainly blind and deaf Jews here during World War II. They produced brooms and brushes.
  • Museum Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf in der Villa Oppenheim – Founded in 1987, Museum of Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf devotes itself and its archive, the collection and events of the research and discuss the regional and everyday history of the district and of Berlin’s cultural history.
  • Museum der Staatlichen Münze Berlin – Since 2007, the museum offers the interactive exhibit “small change” to. With the exhibition project “money art – art money” football motifs on coins and medals of the world “,” stamping technique on Coins and Medals “and” Common Münzthemen in divided Germany. As a manufacturing company in Berlin with the longest tradition, the museum offers the artistic and technical sides of making coins.
  • Museum der Unerhörten Dinge – the museum of the unheard-of things – Outrageous because the museum exhibits are mostly overlooked, unnoticed and unheard-of things.
  • Museum Europäischer Kulturen – The Museum of European Cultures was called into being in 1999 and was created by merging the 110 year-old Museum of European Ethnology (Museum für Volkskunde) with the European collection of the Ethnological Museum. It focuses on lifeworlds in Europe and European cultural points of contact from the 18th century until today. Comprising some 275,000 original objects, the museum houses one of the largest European collections of everyday culture and popular art. The topics covered by the collection are as diverse as the cultures of Europe themselves: ranging from weddings to commemorating the dead, the cult of Napoleon to Halloween, music on Sardinia, the historically pagan ‘Perchten’ processions in the Alps … the list goes on and on.
  • Museum für Asiatische Kunst – The Museum of East Asian Art and the Museum of Indian Art were merged in December 2006 and now operate under a new joint name, the Museum of Asian Art.
  • Museum für Islamische Kunst – The Museum of Islamic Art is situated in the south wing of the Pergamonmuseum. Its permanent exhibition is dedicated to the art of Islamic peoples from the eighth to the nineteenth century. The works of art originate from the vast area stretching from Spain to India. The collection’s main focus is on the Middle East including Egypt and Iran.
  • Museum für Kommunikation – The Museum for Communication in Berlin is one of several locations of Post and Telecommunications Museum Foundation, a direct federal public foundation.
  • Museum für Naturkunde – The “Museum für Naturkunde – Leibniz-Institut für Evolutions- und Biodiversitätsforschung” (Museum für Naturkunde – Leibniz Institute for Research on Evolution and Biodiversity) is a research museum within the Leibniz Association. It is one of the most significant research institutions worldwide in biological and geo-scientific evolution research and biodiversity.
  • Museum für Vor- und Frühgeschichte – The collection’s core focus is European early history, spanning from the Palaeolithic Age to the Middle Ages. Highpoints in the collection include Heinrich Schliemann’s Trojan Collection, the discovery of a Neanderthal from Le Moustier, the Berlin Gold Hat, dating from the Bronze Age, and a wealth of funerary objects from the time of the Merovingian dynasty.
  • Museum im historischen Sudhaus – For all lovers of the brewery and the Cooperage Museum in the historic brewhouse the Berliner Bürgerbräu is a must. The combination of historic buildings and the exhibits revives brewing history. The collection includes barrels, cooling and filling, but also boilers, a huge copper screen and an old malt scoop.
  • Museum im Wasserwerk – The Waterworks Museum in Berlin-Friedrichshagen – This is where documents and objects are collected, made accessible and exhibited as witnesses of the history of Berlin’s water supply and municipal drainage. An ideal combination of nature, historical architecture and engineering as well as a museum display can be experienced at an original location.
  • Museum Kesselhaus Herzberge – The former boiler house has for many years supplied the entire hospital at Herzbergstrasse with heat. Three exhibitions are set up permanently. The focus is on the presentation of three boilers generations and thus the documentation of over 120 years of history boiler. A worldwide unique affair. In addition, the museum offers visitors a Medical History exhibit on the history of the hospital and only here in Berlin information about the architect and city planner Hermann Blankenstein.
  • Museum Köpenick – an exhibition about the legendary “Captain of Köpenick” who in October 1906, occupied the city hall and arrested the mayor.
  • Museum Lichtenberg im Stadthaus – presents the history of Lichtenberg. This ranges from their rural beginnings in the 13th Century through the development of rural and urban communities as well as large industrial sites in the 19 Century to politically significant events in the 20th Century. They include the suppression of the revolution of 1919 on Frankfurter Allee, the unconditional surrender of the armed forces in 1945 and the occupation Karlshorst resolution and the headquarters of the Stasi in 1990 at the Magdalen Road.
  • Museum Neukölln – is a museum located in the Berlin district of BRITZ, which deals with the history of the District of Neukölln . It is the second oldest regional historical Museum in Berlin after the Märkisches Museum. It is located on the former estate of BRITZ.
  • Museum of Decorative Arts – The Kunstgewerbemuseum (Museum of Decorative Arts) is one of the oldest of its kind in Germany. It possesses one of the most important collections of skilled craftsmanship. The museum can be found at two sites: Kulturforum and Schloss Köpenick (Köpenick Palace). This museum collects works of skilled craftsmanship ranging from post-antiquity to the present. It encompasses all the styles and periods in art history and includes silks and costumes, tapestries, decorative wainscots and furniture, vessels made of glass, enamel and porcelain, works in silver and gold as well as contemporary crafts and design objects. Most of the materials involved are of great value. Many items were commissioned by representatives of the church, the royal court and members of the aristocracy.
  • Museum of Photography – The Museum of Photography has been a magnet for photography enthusiasts from all over the world since its opening in 2004. In the last few years alone, over 700,000 visitors have flocked to see exhibitions organised by the Helmut Newton Foundation, ranging from ‘Sex and Landscapes’ to ‘Newton, Nachtwey, Lachapelle: Men, War & Peace’ and ‘Pigozzi and the Paparazzi’. The Museum of Photography is shared between two main organisers, with a total of 2000 square metres of floor space at their disposal. The first is the Helmut Newton Foundation itself, which occupies the two lower floors that have housed the successful permanent exhibition ‘Helmut Newton’s Private Property’, as well as individual exhibitions on the Helmut Newton’s work and his contemporaries. The second is the Art Library’s Photographic Collection, which presides over the newly resplendent Kaisersaal on the second floor.
  • Museum of Prints and Drawings – The Kupferstichkabinett (Museum of Prints and Drawings) is the largest collection of graphic art in Germany – and one of the four most important in the world. It comprises over 550,000 works in the print medium and 110,000 drawings, watercolours and oil sketches. This ‘world of pictures and centre of research’ includes works by major artists ranging from Sandro Botticelli and Albrecht Dürer to Pablo Picasso and Andy Warhol, via Rembrandt and Adolph von Menzel.
  • Museum Treptow – The museum presents Treptow since 8 District History March 1991 with its exhibitions. Topics such as the engine Johannisthal airfield, the first German pilot Melli Beese, the Berlin Industrial Exhibition of 1896, the history of cycling in London, attractions in Treptow, the Teltow canal, or the “shared neighborhood – explorations in the former border area Treptow-Neukölln” are examples .
  • Museumsdorf Düppel – The Düppel City Museum shows a medieval village surrounded by farmland and the surrounding landscape, as it might have looked like 800 years ago.
  • Museumsverbund Pankow – The history of Pankow. The extensive collections of the museum includes historical records of various kind including large objects etc. as well as photos, documents, memoirs of contemporaries, estates of individuals The profile of the museum is greatly influenced by the preparation and presentation of thematic exhibitions.
  • Museumswohnung WBS 70 -WBS 70 is the abbreviation for the housing series 70. It was a type of a residential building in concreteused in the German Democratic Republic (GDR). It was developed by, among others, the German Academy of architecture and the Technical University of Dresdenat the beginning of the 1970s. the first block in the town of Neubrandenburg was built in 1973. This House stands under monumental protectionsince 1984. The 1.52 million dwellings built (units = WE) slab until 1990 the type of WBS 70 is most prevalent with a share of about 42 percent. In Berlin-Hellersdorf, Hellersdorfer road 179, is an unusual Museum apartment of type of WBS 70. The 61-square-foot apartment with three rooms has been faithfully equipped with furnishings from East German production.
  • Musikinstrumenten-Museum SIMPK – The Berlin Museum of Musical Instruments collects musical instruments of European art music from the 16th to 21 Century. Currently, the museum has about 3,200 instruments that are widely used in playable condition. Over 800 instruments are on display in the permanent collection. It is in its diversity is one of the most representative collections in Germany.
  • Neue Kammern am Schloss Sanssouci – In 1768, King Frederick the Great made the decision to have the Orangery converted into a guest palace. Georg Wenzeslaus von Knobelsdorff had erected this building very near to Sanssouci Palace 20 years before. The conversion began in 1771, under the direction of Georg Christian Unger, at which time the interiors received the rich, Rococo décors that have remained intact over time. What awaits the visitor in the “New Chambers” – as the palace was known thereafter – is a succession of opulently decorated ceremonial halls and private suites, designed by the leading artists of Frederick the Great’s era. The rectangular-shaped Jasper Hall at the center of the palace, ornamented with precious stones, is a highlight among the series of rooms. It is crowned by a large ceiling painting with a representation of Venus, referring to 18th century ideals of beauty. In the adjacent Ovid Gallery, scenes from the Roman poet Ovid’s “Metamorphosis” – a favorite theme of Frederick the Great – are depicted in sumptuously gilded wall reliefs.
  • Neues Museum – The museum unites three of the National Museums in Berlin’s major collections under one roof. The various collections are not merely brought together in the Neues Museum in terms of their location, they also relate to one another in terms of their content. This presentation of the testaments of material culture and written sources, spanning several collections at once, traces the development of Old World cultures from prehistory and early history, from the Near East to the Atlantic, from North Africa to Scandinavia and is without parallel for its depth and richness.
  • Neuer Pavillon im Schlosspark Charlottenburg – THE NEW PAVILION – In 1824 Frederick William III had Karl Friedrich Schinkel build him a square, two-story, summer house, east of the New Wing at Charlottenburg Palace and very close to the Spree River. Its model was taken from the Neapolitan Villa Reale del Chiatamone, where the king had stayed during his trip to Italy in 1822. The most obvious reason for erecting the pavilion seems to have been to mark the king’s second, morganatic marriage to Auguste Princess of Liegnitz that same year. The summer villa of simple, middle-class décor, which was predominantly used as Frederick William III’s private sanctuary, was almost completely destroyed during World War II. Since 1970, the interior, which has had to be reconstructed to a great extent, has housed a museum with masterpieces from Schinkel’s era. Paintings from the Romantic Movement and the Biedermeier period – by Carl Blechen, Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Eduard Gaertner – as well as furniture, sculpture, porcelain and decorative cast ironwork made in Berlin are on display.
  • Neues Palais – The New Palace was the last palace built by Frederik the Great in this park. It’s opulence and grandeur served as a clear reminder of the continuing power of the Prussian state after years of deprivation caused by the Seven Years’ War (1756-63).
  • New National Gallery – The Neue Nationalgalerie presents a spectrum of works which ranges from Classical Modern down to Art of the 1960s and 70s. The focus of the collection is on works by representatives of cubism, expressionists, of the Bauhaus, surrealism of the Group Zero and of American color-field painting as well as artists like Pablo Picasso, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Paul Klee, Max Beckmann, Otto Dix and from the era after 1945 Yves Klein, Lucio Fontana, Barnett Newman, Morris Louis, etc.
  • Nikolaikirche – The St. Nikolai-Kirche, (St. Nicholas‘ Church) is the oldest church in Berlin, the capital of Germany. The church is located in the eastern part of central Berlin, the borough of Mitte. The area around the church, bounded by Spandauer Straße, Rathausstraße, the River Spree and Mühlendamm, is known as the Nikolaiviertel ‘Nicholas quarter’, and is an area of restored mediaeval buildings (in some cases recent imitations). The church was built between 1220 and 1230, and is thus, along with the Church of Our Lady at Alexanderplatz not far away, the oldest church in Berlin.
  • Nolde Stiftung Seebüll – Dependance Berlin – Emil Nolde – The painter between Seebüll and Berlin – The work of Emil Nolde (1867 – 1956) is characterized at once by a remarkable variety and at the same time an astonishing density and homogeneity.
  • Belvedere in the Park at Charlottenburg Palace – The Orangery in Sanssouci Park is an impressive example of the buildings created by Frederick William IV, who was known as the “Romantic on the throne.” The imposing building complex – including greenhouses and the central Orangery Palace, sculptures, fountains, arcades and terraces – brings a bit of the Mediterranean sun to Potsdam, while graphically documenting Frederick William IV’s ardent admiration for Italy. Italian Renaissance villas served as its models.
  • Pergamon Museum – accommodates three separate museums: the Collection of Classical Antiquities, the Museum of the Ancient Near East and the Museum of Islamic Art. The monumental reconstructions of archaeological building ensembles – such as the Pergamon Altar, the Market Gate of Miletus and the Ishtar Gate including the Processional Way of Babylon and the Mshatta Façade – made the Pergamonmuseum world-famous.
  • Pfaueninsel – Peacock Island – The 67 hectare Peacock Island, which Frederick William II acquired in 1793, is distinguished by its landscaped garden design, as well as a tree population of approximately 400, exceptionally old, picturesque oaks.
  • Polizeihistorische Sammlung – In 1988, police opened Historical Collection is the result of the exhibits in the criminal collection of educational aids in the Gotha Street and those of the police museum in the police academy, “Joachim Lipschitz”.
  • Pomonatempel auf dem Pfingstberg – In 1801, completed in Pomona is the first building executed by the young architect Karl Friedrich Schinkel. He voted for the tea pavilion to be built in the form of a Greek temple, and took to the north facade of the Erechtheion on the Acropolis of Athens as a model. The blue and white striped summer tent was probably only a few years later added to tea parties and other events on the rooftop, it corresponds exactly to the style of the time and corresponds with appointments in other locks.
  • Puppentheater-Museum Berlin – Daily targeted tours for children and adults through the exhibition as well as temporary puppet theater, fairy stories, readings and workshops for children and adults complement the current exhibition.
  • Römische Bäder – The building ensemble of the “Roman Baths,” which was adapted into Lenné’s landscaped park, is very near Charlottenhof Palace. Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Ludwig Persius had already delivered the first plans in 1826, while the architects were connected with the building of Charlottenhof Palace. Crown Prince Frederick William (IV) accompanied the design process with an abundance of his own drawings. Although the realization of the baths began in 1829, the ensemble took more than a decade to complete.
  • Rotkreuz-Museum Berlin – The Red Cross Museum in Berlin.
  • Sammlung Scharf-Gerstenberg – The Collection Scharf-Gerstenberg can be found in the eastern Stüler building and in the Marstall (stables wing) opposite Charlottenburg Palace. The Collection Scharf-Gerstenberg is exhibiting excellent works by the Surrealists and their forerunners. It presents the holdings of the “Stiftung Sammlung Dieter Scharf zur Erinnerung an Otto Gerstenberg”, the foundation of the Dieter Scharf collection in remembrance of Otto Gerstenberg. The spectrum of artists ranges from Piranesi, Goya and Redon to Dalí, Magritte, Max Ernst and Dubuffet.
  • Sammlungen des Winckelmann-Instituts – Lehrsammlung Klassische Archäologie – COLLECTION OF WINCKELMANN INSTITUTE FOR CLASSICAL ARCHAEOLOGY AT THE HUMBOLDT UNIVERSITY BERLIN
  • Schloss Babelsberg – Babelsberg Palace was built according to plans by Karl Friedrich Schinkel in the charming hilly countryside on the Havel River in 1833, as a summer residence for the later Emperor William I and his wife Augusta. Inspired by Tudor style English models, Schinkel created the first neo-Gothic palace on the continent. Schinkel’s concept was modified through later additions by Ludwig Persius and Johann Heinrich Strack. Few of the original furnishings and interior decorations, which were also predominantly in the neo-Gothic style, have survived. The extensive park was designed by Peter Joseph Lenné and Prince von Pückler-Muskau as an English landscape garden. Due to renovation work, the palace is not currently open to visitors.
  • Schloss Britz – Gutshaus, Schlosspark, Gutshof – This magnificent manor house in the Neukölln district of Berlin was built in 1706 on the site of a medieval timber-framed building. In the 18th Century, the mansion owned Prussian senior court official and Minister of State. 1971 Schloss Britz has been declared a national monument. The Neukölln district restored the castle from 1985 to 1988.
  • Schloss Caputh – The small royal, electoral country estate, Caputh Palace, is the only surviving palace building in the Potsdam cultural landscape, which represents the era of the Great Elector, Friedrich Wilhelm of Brandenburg. Caputh Palace (built after 1662) belonged to Frederick William’s second wife, Dorothea.
  • Schloss Cecilienhof – The Palace of the Potsdam Conference. From 1913-17, Emperor William II had Cecilienhof Palace built in the north of the New Garden for his eldest son Crown Prince William and his wife Crown Princess Cecilie.
  • Schloss Charlottenburg – Charlottenburg Palace today is the largest residence of the Hohenzollern in Berlin. Originally built by Elector Frederick III as a summer residence for his wife Sophie Charlotte in 1699, the palace was later extended into a stately building with a cours d’honneur. The magnificent palace is surrounded by a baroque garden, in which diverse architectures melt into a unique ensemble. The entire palace presents itself with majestically equipped rooms and saloons and with top-class art collections that offer outstanding masterpieces: For example, one of the largest collections of French paintings of the 18th century outside of France.
  • Schloss Charlottenhof – Charlottenhof Palace is a small neoclassical summer residence located to the southwest of Sanssouci. After 1826 it was made the focus point of the park through the deliberate garden design.
  • Schloss Friedrichsfelde – Friedrichsfelde Castle -Located in the zoo presents itself early classical Friedrichsfelde Castle. Originally built in 1685 for the kurbrandenburgischen Marine Director, it experienced a turbulent history under various lords of the castle.
  • Schloss Glienicke – When Prince Carl of Prussia returned to Berlin from his trip to Italy in 1823, the 21-year old prince had made up his mind to realize his dream of an Italian villa in a charming, Mediterranean landscape right in the middle of the “dry sandbox of the Brandenburg Marches.” The Glienicke estate, with its lovely grounds of lush meadows, surrounded by hills of rich foliage gently rolling down to the Havel River, fully complied with the prince’s taste. The landscape gardener Peter Joseph Lenné had created its pleasure ground for the previous owner, Prince Karl August von Hardenberg. Nevertheless, radical changes were first implemented after Prince Carl took over the property.
  • Schloss Königs Wusterhausen – Königs Wusterhausen Palace was originally a medieval castle. It was the favourite haunt of Frederick William I, who used it as a hunting lodge and held his famous Tabakskollegium or “tobacco round” here.
  • Schloss Köpenick – Dependance des Kunstgewerbemuseums – At Köpenick Palace, a new museum concept is devised: under the heading “RoomArt”, furniture and decorative art from the Renaissance, Baroque and Rococo periods are jointly presented.
  • Schloss Paretz – Paretz Palace and its surrounding village were built by David Gilly from 1797-1804 as a summer residential complex for crown prince Friedrich Wilhelm and his wife Luise . They belong to the most significant documentary evidence of Prussian bucolic architecture around 1800.
  • Schloss Rheinsberg – Frederick the Great spent the happiest time of his life in Rheinsberg as the crown prince. His younger brother, Prince Henry of Prussia, created here what was considered to be a unique “court of muses” in Europe, and he lastingly determined the character of the palace and gardens in the Early Neoclassical style. In his “Wanderungen durch die Mark Brandenburg” (Walks through the Brandenburg Marches), Theodor Fontane provided the city with a literary monument, and soon thereafter Kurt Tucholsky made Rheinsberg into the charming fulfillment of lighthearted love. Even today, there is hardly a visitor who can escape the delightful legends of Rheinsberg.
  • Schloss Sacrow – Frederick William IV acquired the Sacrow estate shortly after his accession to the throne in 1840, so that he might further beautify the Potsdam garden landscape. At the same time the king had the Church of the Savior, designed by Ludwig Persius in the shape of an early Christian basilica, built very nearby. Peter Joseph Lenné took over the scenic design of this outstanding, royal park complex.
  • Schloss Sanssouci – No other palace is more closely connected with the personality of Frederick the Great than Sanssouci. The name Sanssouci – “without care” – should be understood as the aspiration and leitmotif of the king, because it is here that he most preferred to withdraw from the world with his dogs. In the end, Frederick the Great’s summer residence was both a favorite place and an important sanctuary for him in difficult times. The location of the palace on the celebrated vineyard terraces and the originally preserved, 18th century interior decorations permit today’s visitor to become immersed in the world of the philosophers from Sanssouci. The rooms are marked by elegance and tasteful displays of splendor. They also let the king’s love for delightful surroundings, for the Prussian Arcadia, be clearly felt. It is interesting that the king desired to be buried in a grave on the highest vineyard terrace. Even in death, he wanted to be near his Sanssouci. His wish, although quite belated, was finally fulfilled in 1991.
  • Schloss Schönhausen – Schönhausen one of the few Berlin palace buildings, which survived World War II intact. 1740 gave Frederick II (the Great), the property of his wife, Queen Elizabeth Christine, who lived there until her death in the 1797th Outstanding are the largely still existing decorations of the late 17th and the 18th Century, including a magnificent ballroom and stuccoed over three floors reaching double-barreled staircase.
  • Schlossmuseum Oranienburg – Today the palace belongs to the city of Oranienburg. Since 2001, the palace museum has exhibited works of art mainly by Dutch artists, including paintings by Jan Lievens, Govert Flinck, Jan Mijtens and Anthony van Dyck. The Porcelain Chamber is the highlight of the royal apartment. At one time nearly 5000 pieces of porcelain were displayed here. Today, one of the étagère that was created for this room around 1695 is set with East Asian porcelain from the 17th and 18th centuries and provides a glimpse of the former splendor.
  • Schwules Museum – The Gay Museum includes the exhibition area, the archive and the library. “We show gay life in all its facets, and collect and preserve a variety of documents and self-statements about homosexuals themselves and their lives. This will guarantee the scientific study and preparation and we also make these documents and other researchers interested in for their projects accessible.”
  • Science Center Spectrum – Why is the sky blue? Can you see heat? Any why does a plane stay up in the sky? Just three of the hundreds of questions answered at Science Center Spectrum. Please note the Science Center is closed until summer 2013.
  • Skulpturensammlung und Museum für Byzantinische Kunst – Sculpture Collection and Museum of Byzantine Art – The Sculpture Collection is one of Germany’s largest collections of sculptures dating from the Middle Ages and later. It originates in the Prussian “Art Cabinet” collections, the Brandenburgisch-Preußische Kunstkammern.
  • Sonderausstellungshallen Kulturforum – In the 1960s, the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz (Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation) decided to relocate the collections of European art to the Kulturforum near Potsdamer Platz, the site of the already existing Staatsbibliothek (State Library).
  • Spandovia sacra – Museum der Ev. Kirchengemeinde – The Reformation history museum of St. Nicholas on Reformationsplatz 12 is housed in an essentially derived from the medieval half-timbered house. Since the St. Nikolai church is as old as the city (since 1232) and the district (since 1920) Spandau, have over the centuries accumulated a lot of valuable things: paintings, Supper devices, church records and documents. The exhibitions are devoted mainly to ecclesiastical history, which is always a part of the local and regional history.
  • Sportmuseum Berlin – The museum is housed in its own premises in the Berlin Olympic Park. In 1994, the Berlin Sports Museum, Germany’s oldest and largest sports museum of AIMS “crowned” at the World Congress in Macau for AIMS Marathon Museum of Running. The museum collects everything “about the sport,” preserves and researches to document for future generations to the development of sports and their “team”. The Running of the world is one of the major priorities of the sport collection Museum Berlin.
  • Staatliche Museen zu Berlin -The National Museums in Berlin, housed in historical buildings, constitute a Universal Museum for the preservation, research and mediation of treasures of art and culture of the entire history of humanity. Their collections embrace the areas of European and extra- European art, archaeology and ethnology.The National Museums in Berlin, the origins of which lie in the foundation of the Royal Museum through Friedrich Wilhelm III of Prussia, belong to the Stiftung Preußischer Kulturbesitz. Further members of the Foundation are the State Library, the State Archive, the Ibero-American Institute and the State Institute for Music Research with the Museum of Musical Instruments. Supported collectively by the German government and the federal states, the National Museums in Berlin regard themselves as a national institution of cultural federalism in Germany. The National Museums in Berlin can be found at five locations in Berlin: Museum Island Berlin / Mitte, Kulturforum, Tiergarten, Charlottenburg, Dahlem and Köpenick.
  • Stadtgeschichtliches Museum Spandau / Zitadelle Spandau – Spandau Citadel, the renaissance fortress in Berlin.
  • Stasimuseum Berlin – Forschungs- und Gedenkstätte Normannenstraße – House 1 – The headquarter of the State Security Considering itself the “shield and sword of the party” it was from this compound that the Stasi conducted its nearly 40-year-long fight against the so called enemies of the Socialist Unity Party of Germany (SED) – against those who refused to follow the guidelines of the regime, against those who did not conform to its ideas of a human being. The centerpiece of the highly secured compound was “house 1”, constructed in 1960. It was built as the seat of the offices of the Minister of State Security. From 1957 to 1989 the head of the Stasi was Erich Mielke. After citizens occupied the premises in January 1990, the Association for Anti-Stalinist Action (ASTAK e.V.) opened “house 1” on the 7th of November 1990 as research and memorial site. The former headquarters of the secret police were now open to the public. The minister’s offices (“the Mielke suite”), the offices of those of his inner circle as well as the conference room and lounge have been almost completely preserved in their original condition. After substantial renovation, “house 1” was reopened in January 2012 with temporary exhibitions provided by the Federal Commissioner for the Stasi Records (BStU) and ASTAK e.V. A new joint permanent exhibition “State Security in the GDR” is in preparation an scheduled to open by the end of 2013.
  • Stiftung Deutsches Technikmuseum Berlin – The Archenhold Observatory offers a wide-ranging astronomy programs for all ages: look through a telescope, listen to a talk or follow one of our thematic guided tours.
  • Steglitz Museum – Museum of the History of the district Steglitz.
  • Tempelhof Museum – Tempelhof-Schöneberg is an inner city district in Berlin with 330 000 inhabitants. Two local museums are located here: the Tempelhof Museum in the part of town known as Alt-Mariendorf and the Schöneberg Museum, located in the heart of Schöneberg, with its affiliated Young People’s Museum. The Schöneberg Museum holds the common archive which preserves the historical collections that have been acquired for decades.
  • The Kennedys – The collection “THE KENNEDYS” of the CAMERA WORK AG is one of the world’s most comprehensive compilations of photographic work, official documents, private documents, and memorabilia of the Kennedy family.
  • The Story of Berlin – Die Erlebnisausstellung der Hauptstadt mit originalem Atomschutzbunker – THE STORY OF BERLIN at the Kurfürstendamm is the interactive museum of the capital. Spread over 6.000 square meters visitors can explore 800 years of Berlin history. In 23 theme rooms – each of them designed individually and equipped with modern multimedia technology – everyone can experience everyday life of the people of Berlin during different eras. One highlight of the exhibition is a guided tour through an original nuclear bomb shelter from the Cold War below the Kurfürstendamm which still can be used by 3.600 persons in case of an emergency.
  • Topographie des Terrors – As the “site of the perpetrators,” the “Topography of Terror” fulfills a special role among the many remembrance sites, monuments and museums in Berlin today that commemorate the era of National Socialism. Located in the center of the capital, it provides information at an authentic site about the headquarters of the National Socialist SS and police state and reveals the European dimensions of the Nazi reign of terror.
  • Tränenpalast – The Haus der Geschichte der Bundesrepublik Deutschland Foundation presents the “Border Experiences – Everyday life in Divided Germany” permanent exhibition at the original location of the “Tränenpalast”, now a listed building. With a combination of real-life stories, original objects and interviews with contemporary witnesses, the exhibition provides a vivid insight into life in the shadow of division and the border. The display also presents the key turning points in the reunification process.
  • Vorderasiatisches Museum – Museum of the Ancient Near East – The Museum of the Ancient Near East ranks alongside the Louvre and the British Museum as one of the world’s leading museums of ancient oriental treasures. Shown in an area covering 2,000 square meters the exhibits convey an impression of six thousand years of history, culture and art in the ancient Near East.
  • Werkbundarchiv – Museum der Dinge – Werkbundarchiv – Museum of things implicates the scope of the Werkbund – everyday life and the goods producing society – used for work.
  • Zeiss-Großplanetarium Berlin – Our planetarium shows take you on fascinating journeys through the world of astronomy. Succumb to the fascination of the beauty of the universe. The Zeiss Planetarium guarantees you a cloudless view of the heavens. Science, theater, music and audio all have their place in Germany’s biggest planetarium.
  • Zeiss-Großplanetarium -What you see in the Planetarium is a projection of the starry sky, so it is always cloudless. Unlike an observatory where you observe the actual stars and planets, the firmament here is artificial.You can take a comfortable seat in the air-conditioned auditorium and gaze up at the planetarium dome. It does not open, because it is a screen for projections of the stars and for slide, video and laser shows. Our advanced projection technology gives you the feeling you are always at the centre of events. The Zeiss-Großplanetarium Berlin was opened in October 1987 as one of the largest and most modern stellar theatres in Europe. The heart of the house is the planetarium’s projector Cosmorama, from Carl Zeiss Jena, in the 23 metres large dome. Almost 3 million people have visited the planetarium from the year 1987 until 2004.
  • Zille Museum – The Zille MUSEUM dedicated to the life and work of Heinrich Zille. The permanent exhibition, Heinrich Zille – Life and Work shows original Drawings, lithographs and photographs of the artist. Letters and examples of magazines and books in which his images were published, give a further insight into his work.
  • Zucker-Museum – The Sugar Museum in Berlin-Wedding told the story of sugar – where it comes from, how it is made. Quite simply: nearly everything about sugar.
  • Zweiradmuseum – See the motorcycle museum and our STEIB replica sidecars, STEIB spare parts and motorcycle spare parts! We are enthusiasts of vintage motorcycles and sidecars. Since 1987 we run a small private museum in Berlin-Kreuzberg. We show some 40 motorcycles from 1926 to the early sixties, German and English, restored and un-restored as well as engines, sidecars, bicycles and related items.

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